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The information on this pages is provided for informational purposes only. It is not to be construed as legal advice or counsel.


With college costs rising every year, few families can afford to pay the full cost of a higher education without some financial aid assistance. Luckily, the federal government offers a host of financial aid programs that may help you meet college expenses.

  • Pell Grant
    Depending upon your level of financial need, full- and part-time undergraduate students may receive up to $5,500 a year as a Pell Grant. Students may only receive this type of award for no more than 12 semesters. Pell grants do not need to be repaid.
  • National SMART Grant
    One of the newest financial aid opportunities available during the third and fourth years of undergraduate study to full-time students who are eligible for the Federal Pell Grant, maintain a minimum GPA, and who are majoring in physical, life, or computer sciences, mathematics, technology, or engineering or in a foreign language determined critical to national security. Awards of up to $4,000 per year are made. This grant does not need to be repaid.
  • Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)
    Eligible students may receive up to $4,000 a year with an FSEOG award. Pell Grant recipients receive priority FSEOG awards. This grant does not need to be repaid
  • Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher Education (TEACH) Grant
    Students preparing to enter the elementary or secondary teaching profession may receive up to a $4,000 grant a year. In exchange for the grant money, students must agree to complete a teaching service obligation in a low-income, high-needs school.
  • Federal Work Study
    Administered on a first-applied, first-awarded basis, work study provides part-time employment to full- or part-time undergraduate and graduate students.
  • Federal Perkins Loans
    Low-interest federal student loans for undergraduate and graduate students with exceptional financial need. In 2012, the interest rate was locked in at 5%. Undergraduate students may receive up to $5,500 a yearin Perkins Loans.
  • Federal PLUS Loans
    Low-interest federal student loans for parents of dependent undergraduate students, as well as graduate and professional degree students. In 2012, the interest rate was locked in at 7.9%. Maximum loan amount is determined by the cost of attendance minus other awarded aid.
  • Federal Direct Loans
    Subsidized and unsubsidized loans are federal student loans for eligible students to help cover the cost of higher education at a four-year college or university, community college, or trade, career, or technical school. Loan amounts are variable and dependent upon how long you've been in school.

Returning Financial Aid Awards

Sometimes, students do not complete a semester of school. Whether you withdraw from classes, are dismissed from school, face a medical emergency, or elect a planned leave of absence - not completing your academic commitment for a semester may require that you return some or all of your federal financial aid.

Schools are required to determine a student's earned financial aid in order to calculate whether the student must return a portion of their award grant. Earned aid is determined by the number of calendar days a student has attended classes, since the school's first day of classes for the semester. Generally, students who withdraw after completing 60% of the semester do not need to return financial aid.



The information on this pages is provided for informational purposes only. It is not to be construed as legal advice or counsel.


                 

 
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December 16, 2017

 

 

 

 

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